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emorabilia 







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Campus Life 




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Sports 






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Graduation 



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49 



97 



129 



145 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/memor96kean 



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Kean College 

Union, New Jersey 
07083 

Muriel Celestin, Editor 



Starting with a SPARK 





3 Football 





Home Coming 4 



Sparks to 
a new Beat 





7 Home Coming Concert 



Leading the Spirit 








P.A.S.U. Kwanzaa Festival 



A Touch of Reality 

Dr. Leonard Jeffries 




Adding 

to the 

Excitement 




11 Pep Rally 



Shades 



of 



Harlem 




Shades of Harlem 12 



Reigniting 

the 

Spirit 





* PI 




' E? 


f^VH^^^L^I 




j|E^^S 


<hH 


V^JF A 





sHi 




Home Coming 14 





WELCOME 

UUMNI 



16 Home Coming 



(^ for 
colored girls 

who have 
considered suicide 




Wilkin's 
Theater 



ti < <lu< ti< n\ 




18 




19 




20 







1 \- 




■""'"V, .-.' | ■ 
- * 




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22 





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25 










26 





27 



TE 












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-1 





28 




Sexual 

Assault 

Awareness 

Week 





r 




rfKOUWD 




^_ 




%-^^j 



* "»*''» wT_i "" 




31 




32 



1 






*4 * 


1 H 


^•■^W «i|)r 




Uv 




% 

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SIR 






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34 




35 




36 




38 







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39 




43 




44 




eniors 




47 



ABADIOTAKIS 









**M 






. 


j 




I ^ 



Athena Abadiotakis 

Early Childhood Education 




Karen Adams 

English 





Vera Abdelsayed 

Medical Technology 




Diane Albino 

Elementary Education 





Mary Abood 

Elementary Education 




Colette Alcine 




April Alfano 

Psychology 



Asad Ali 



Taji Caparella-Alston 

Psychology 



48 



AYLING 




Gina Anastasio 

Political Science 




Judy April 





Daniel Anderson 



lennifer Apruzzese 






Margaretta Appolon 




Ceorgina Armengol 

Psychology 




Lynnette Ayala 



Suzanne Ayers 

Accounting 



Patricia Ayling 

Early Childhood Education 



49 



BACON 




Robin Bacon 

Public Administration 




Dennis Bantle Jr. 

Teacher of the Handicapped 





Linet Badell 

Psychology 




Melissa Bara 

Management Science 




Kristen Baldoni 

Early Childhood Education 




Luis Barraza 

Psychology 





Denise Barrett 

Management Science 



Susie Bartolome 

Speech & Hearing 



Jeannine Basilie 

Management Science 



50 



BOWERS 




Jill Berger 

Psychology 



3% -* 




Caryn Bigger 

Psychology 





Wendy Billing 

Social Work 




Marc Birger 



Tamara Boettger 

Psychology 



Peter Boon 

Accounting 




Stephen Bowers 

Management Science 



51 



BREHM 




Maureen Brehm 




Cheryl Brown 

Communications 





Kellie Brill 

Elementary Education 




David Brown 

Public Administration 





Zoila Brito 

Computer Science 




Laura Bryant 




Alan Bullet 
Computer Science 



Michelle Burrows 

Management Science 



Jessica Cantos 

Economics 



52 



CEBALLO 




Christopher Carey 



Lora Carucci 

Psychology 



Lori Cario 

Teacher of the Handicapped 





Antonio Carvalho 






Daiselyn Carr 

Management Science 




Iris Castro 

Sociology 




Patsy Catino 

Political Science 



Janice Cavuto 

Elementary Education 



Elba Ceballo 

Elementary Education 



53 



CELESTIN 




Jennifer Christ 

Communication 



Elsa Chung 

Recreation Administration 





' n 






Sheeba Chishti 

Biology 




Sherry Clark 

Sociology 





Karen Clarke 



Sarah Clifford 

Management Science 



Claire Codada 



54 




Mindy Cohen 

Fine Arts 




Nicole Colpaert 

Elementary Education 





COVELLO 




Mark Colalillo 




Josiane Constant 




Alexis Cooper 

Early Childhood Education 





Renee Correia 

Elementary Education 



Kristen Costa 

Psychology 



Susan Colvello 



55 



CROSSON 





Thomas Crosson 

Political Science 




Michelle Dabney 




John Crowley 

Management Science 




Algin Dalisay 

Management Science 





Cheryl Cunha 




Srinivas Damidi 




Cinette Day 

Biology 



Danielle Deangelo 

Recreation Administration 



Denise Debenedicts 

Accounting 



56 



DIAZ 




Carla Dejura 

Early Childhood Education 




Jacqueline Denaia 

Psychology 





Andrea Delbouno 

Elementary Education 



Lisa Deo 

Theatre 



Guillermo Delrosario 

Economics 





Augusto De Souza 

Psychology 




Wendy Deutsch 

Speech & Hearing 



Maria Cespedes De Vallejo 



Aileen Diaz 

Management Science 



57 



DILAPI 




Lisa Dilepi 

Recreation Administration 



Shernett Dixon 

Management Science 






Christine Dipietro 

Elementary Education 




Ernesto Dizon II 

Management Science 





Danielle Disano 

Elementary Education 

Mi 




John Doesberg 

Political Science 




Diane Dougher 

Elementary Education 



Keisha Douglas 

Mathematical Science 



Nicole Douglas 

Elementary Education 



58 



EASTER 




Leslie Dowling 

Mathematical Science 




Caroline Dudeck 

Psychology 





Jennifer Drapczak 

Accounting 




Eusebio Dulog 

Psychology 





Chrisoula Drivas 

Elementary Education 




Aleksandra Dumic 

Management Science 




Timika Dunham 

Accounting 



Brian D'Zio 

Management Science 



Marlin Easter 

Chemistry 



59 



EHLEN 




Lorraine Ehlen 

Public Administration 





Eliodoros Eliodorou 




Margo English 

Social Work 




Trudy Emara 

Accounting 





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9 

M 




ml ■ ill 



Lori Enquist 

Psychology 




Michael Esola 



Melissa Espana 

Elementary Education 



Henry Etienne 

Biology 



60 




Mangonese Etienne 





Francisco Farfan 

Psychology 




Gail Felberbaum 

History 





Fred Farina 

History 




Maryann Ferguson 

Management Science 




Christina Ferrera 

English 



John Flanagan 



Wilgains Fleuridor 

Management Science 



61 



LOREK 




Donna Florek 

Early Childhood Education 




Marilu Garcia 

Early Childhood Education 





Joseph Frias 

Psychology 





Tracie Lynn Fryzowicz 

Teacher of the Handicapped 




Victor Gomez-Carcia 

Computer Science 




Carol Garrison 

Elementary Education 



Patrick Geller 

Earth Science 



Robert George 

Management Science 



62 




GUNN 



Douglas Gervolino 

Psychology 




I I 

Kelly Gray 

Early Childhood Education 




luanita Coins 

Social Work 



Jeannette Green 

Teacher of the Handicapped 




Desiree Gray 

Political Science 





Jennifer Gregory 

Recreation Administration 





Gina Guerino 

Early Childhood Education 



Stephen Guillen 

Communication 



Keri Gunn 

Elementary Education 



63 



GUNTHER 





Aimee-Marette Gunther 




Richard Hamernik 

Earth Science 




Agnes Haffner 

Public Administration 



Monica Harris 

Psychology 






lames Hallik 

Physical Education 




Theresa Harrison 

Elementary Education 




Pamela Hawkins 

Management Science 



Cleophus Hendrix III 

Public Administration 



Ivone Henriques 

Early Childhood Education 



64 






JACKSON 




Agnes Heslip 

Management Science 




Mary Hodes 

Management Science 





Michelle Heuser 

Elementary Education 




Rhonda Moseley-Holmes 





Patricia Hudson 

Early Childhood Education 




Christina Intveld 

Social Work 



Elizabeth Irizarry 

Management Science 



Benjamin )ackson 

Political Science 



65 



JAMES 




Miriam James 

Management Science 




Sulisnet Sanchez-Jimenez 

Elementary Education 





Andrea Jandoli 

Psychology 




C^ 



Kettchell Johnson 






Karen Jelinek 

Early Childhood Education 




Trina Johnson 

Political Science 




Theodore Karol 

History 



Robert Katz 

Early Childhood Education 



Wing Keitang 



66 



Steven Keleman 

Public Administration 



Kimberly Kermes 

Teacher of the Handicapped 







KIM 





Ginger Kelley 

Communications 





Walter Kelly 

Communications 




Imran Khan 

Management Science 




Munir Khan 

Management Science 



Naeem Khan 



Sunmi Kim 

Computer Science 



67 



KING 





Kirsten King 

Psychology 





Rebecca Kinneman 




Evan Koblentz 

Engineering 





Denise Kmita 

Management Science 




Rasheen Kornegay 

History 




Lisa Kroposky 

Psychology 



Diane Kuldanek 



Ellen Lamb 

Elementary Education 



68 




LOPES 



Jason Lambert 

Psychology 




Ana Lerro 

Psychology 




Nichole Layton 

Speech & Hearing 




Irisa Leverette 

Management Science 



Gina Liento 

Fine Arts 





Paula Lehman 

Elementary Education 




Sandra Liebiedz 




Liliana Lopes 

History 



Marly Lopes 

Communications 



69 



LOPEZ 






Alexander Lopez 

Occupational Therapy 




Mark Lyons 

Public Administration 



V 




Frankie Lucas 

Political Science 



Michael Lyons 

Sociology 



Marlow Luna 

Industrial Technology 





Svetlana Lyubavin 

Accounting 





Scott Madlinger 

Management Science 



Karen Magarelli 

Nursing 



Michelle Magrans 

Elementary Education 



70 



MASSON JR. 



■ 



(£) 



3 




Anthony Malangone 

Political Science 




Jennifer Markowitz 

Psychology 





Wendy Marple 





Jennifer Manning 

Communications 




Jeanette Martinez 

Social Work 




Tania Martinez 

Management Science 



David Marut 

Political Science 



Marcial Masson, Jr. 

Computer Science 



71 



MATTI 




Ramon Matti 




Denise McBride 

Early Childhood Education 





Kathleen Mauer 

Early Childhood Education 




Margaret McCarthy 

Elementary Education 




Delopeena Maxwell 

Accounting 




» • . . 



Jane McCullough 

Teacher of the Handicapped 




Meggin McDonald 

Biology 



Melissa McDonald 

Early Childhood Education 



Jennifer Mclnereny 

Public Administration 



72 



MONTEAGUDO 




Cecilia McSherry 

Biology 




Angela Merlucci 

Early Childhood Education 







Maria Mejia 

Nursing 






fjk 




Mftil 


, % 












ip 4 











Michele Michalek 

Elementary Education 





Victor Melino 

Psychology 




Jacqueline Miranda 

Management Science 




Michele Mitchell 

Accounting 



Jenny Molinares 

Industrial Technology 



Harold Monteagudo 

Physical Education 



73 



MOOKHERJEE 








Devi Mookherjee 

Management Science 




Michael Mulhern 

Management Science 





Lena Moore 

Political Science 





Kimberlie Morrison 

Early Childhood Education 




Imelda Murray 

Teacher of the Handicapped 



I 

■ 

: 




Joyce Narain 

Accounting 



Michelle Nater 

Recreation Administration 



•T- •. •/• ..." •••••,*:•• . 

Tabitha Newkirk 

Management Science 



74 



OCHOA 




Anne Ngugi 

Accounting 




Matthew Normann 

Elementary Education 












Sherry Nigro 




Teacher of the Handicapped 






i 


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j 




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A M 




Wi\ *** w ^ ^« 


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If 








Charlene Noto 

Physical Education 



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s 




I 




Myrtho Jean-Noel 




Jacqueline Nunes 

Speech & Hearing 




Charles Nyewah 

Accounting 



Mark Oberle 



Astrid Ochoa 

Recreation Administration 



75 



OCHOLA 




*K 






Sammy Ochola 

Computer Science 




Bernadette O'Mara 




Social Work 




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W T "** 1 \ 




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I 




Michael Olshefski 

Communications 




Shrima Patel 



Ursula Pereira 

Speech & Hearing 




Amweno Olubayi 

Accounting 




Michele Peragine 

Speech & Hearing 




Michelle Perez 

Psychology 



Warner Perez 

Management Science 



76 



PLUNKETT 




Teresa Perrone 

Political Science 




Kenneth Peterson 

Mathematical Science 





Rabindranauth Persaud 

Accounting 





Derek Peters 

Elementary Education 




Dorothy Pierce 

Nursin 




- 



Michele Pillari 

English 



Jermaine Plant 

Public Administration 



Michelle Plunkett 



77 



POLK 




Stacie Polk 

Public Administration 




Daniel Posner 

Industrial Technology 





Cheryl Downes-Pornovets 




Erica Porteous 
Psychology 




Janet Queen 

English 




Ruben Quito 

Economics 



Dana Rabman 

Teacher of the Handicapped 



Jose Ramirez 

Industrial Technology 



78 



RIVAS 




Martha Ramirez 

Computer Science 




Tracey Rayner 





Herbert Ramos 

Physical Education 




Erich Reuter 

Management Science 





Trevor Raymond 

Accounting 




Staci Reyes 

Psychology 




Maria Ricca 

Early Childhood Education 



Robin Richards 

Social Work 



Aleida Rivas 

Management Science 



79 



RIVERA 








Maria Rivera 

Management Science 




Jenny Rodrigues 

Elementary Education 





Florence Rodriques 

Psychology 









$&&rB 



Milagros Rodriguez 

Psychology 





Isabel Rodrigues 

Management Science 



Rachel Rodriguez 

Biology 








Sylvia Rodriguez 

Psychology 



Ruthanne Rowe 

Public Administration 



Edermira Ruiz 

Elementary Education 



80 



SAUNDERS 




Patricia Russo 

Engineering 







Jennifer Sager 

Teacher of the Handicapped 





Tracey Sackel 

Psychology 




Sonia Sanabia 





Dania Saenz 

Elementary Education 





Elliot Sanchez 

Biology 




Diane Sandland 

Social Work 



Carolyn Sanford 

Occupational Therapy 



Demetria Saunders 

English 



81 



SAUNDERS 




VI 

Monique Saunders 

Early Childhood Education 




Ivan Schubert 

Management Science 





Craig Savage 

Sociology 




Michael Schwab 

Computer Science 





Jeffrey Schneider 

Management Science 




Tara Schwager 

Management Science 




Marissa Ann Scorese 

Early Childhood Education 



Pamela Scully 

Political Science 



Michael Semple 

Public Administration 



82 





SMITH 




Cari Shapiro 

Psychology 





Nicole Sherloff 

Psychology 




Janeen Sivills 





Heather Shober 




Aimee Smith 

Early Childhood Education 




Corstina Smith 

Accounting 



Deitria Smith 

History 



Maureen Smith 

Management Science 



83 



SMITH 




Nicole Smith 




Adrian Smothers 

Political Science 





Nicole Smith 



Nancy Sobchik 

Early Childhood Education 






Tracey Smith 

Physical Education 




Jhanina Soria 

Management Science 




Melissa Sorrenti 

Elementary Education 



Julie Lynn Spatola 

Elementary Education 



Eric Von Spreckelsen 



84 




SZNYTER 



Michael Stachowicz 

Industrial Science 



Reggie Sumner 

Communications 






Veronica Stevens 

Biology 




Sudee Suwatson 

Psychology 




Dayana Suarez 

Psychology 




Collen Swick 

Psychology 




Levit Sylvia 



Sandra Szafranski 

Physical Education 



Mary Ann Sznyter 

Social Work 



85 



TATTOLI 




Mark Tattoli 

Biology 




Saudia Thompson 

Speech and Hearing 





Maribel Tavares 

Management Science 




Patricia Tivenan 

Teacher of Handicapped 





Maria Testa 

Elementary Education 




Junko Toriumr 

Spanish 




Kimberly Tracey 

Elementary Education 



Dino Tripicchio 

Accounting 



Sergio Tripicchio 

Management Science 



86 



VILLEGAS 




John Trochimowicz 

Management Science 




Diana Vadillo 

Management Science 





Scott Turrini 

Physical Therapy 



Jefree Valerio 

Management Science 




« 






Janitha Ubagarathe 

Computer Science 




Patricia Vanco 

Management Science 




Tracy Vannoy 

Accounting 



Victoria Cerda Vasquez 



Guiomar Villegas 

Management Science 



87 



VOLGER 




Debbie Ann Volger 




Eric Weising 

Mathematical Science 




Marianne Lee Walker 

Psychology 




Deborah Weiskott 

Sociology 




Robert Wassberg 

Computer Science 




Marc Weiscott 

Computer Science 




David Weiss 

Public Administration 



Teresa Weyerberg 

Public Administration 



Jennie Whalen 

Earlv Childhood Education 



88 



WINFIELD 







Deide Wheeler 

Social Work 



Carl Wiley 

Chemistry 






Tu-Shonda Whitaker 

English 




Dorothy Williams 

Public Administration 





Mary Wickens 

Early Childhood Education 




Emma Williams 

Public Administration 




Harry Williams 

Philosophy & Religion 



Keith Williams 

Public Administration 



Colby Winfield 



89 



WINGARD 




i 

Don juan Wingard 

Psychology 




Andre Wise 

Elementary Education 





Leeann Wyble 

Elementary Education 




Joanne Wysocki 



Bekir Yavsal 




Renee Yoskowitz 

Psychology 



90 



ZEH 







Robin Yvonne 

Management Science 





Maria Zacharatos 

Psychology 





Loretta Zahn 

Teacher of Handicapped 



Tina Zavner 



Ian Zeh 



91 




94 




95 




96 




sports 




97 




D 



espite a disappointing 
3-4-2 season, the football 
team has numerous things 
to build on for next sea- 
son. At the top of the list 
is running back Trenell 
Smith who will be return- 
ing for his senior cam- 
paign. Smith was the 12th 
leading rusher in the na- 
tion despite suffering 
through a variety of inju- 
ries for the last four games. 
A first team All-Confer- 



ence and ECAC selection, 
Smith finished the year 
with a school-record 1,109 
yards. 

Opening the holes for 
Smith will be offensive 
guard Patsy Venetucci, 
who was also named All- 
Conference and All- 
ECAC, along with tackle 
Phil Brown, who was a 
second team All-NJAC se- 
lection. 

While Smith and Vene- 



tucci leave the offense in 
great shape, the defense 
will be led by Joe Antico 
who was a first team All- 
NJAC selection as he 
boasted 69 tackles includ- 
ing 16 for losses. 

Other postseason hon- 
orees for the Cougars in- 
clude Robinson lineback- 
er Robbie Thiemann, de- 
fensive linemen Windale 
Bates and Niketa Zeigler, 
along with defensive backs 
Erik Sherman and Bruce 
Pritchett and punter Mike 
Mahady. 

Ending their productive 
careers are quarterback 
Mark Cummings, long 
snapper Dan Ownes, wide 
receiver Gerald Brown 
and defensive backs Brian 
Mooney and Jermaine 
Plant. 



99 



NAME 


GOALS 


AST 


SHT5 


PTS 


Noelle Meeke 


31 




11 




135 


73 


Lacey Thiery 


8 




11 




41 


27 


Christine Fanelli 


5 




3 




41 


13 


Merrie Reilly 


1 




6 




14 


8 


Catherine Esposito 


2 




2 




26 


6 


Amanda Miller 


1 




3 




41 


5 


Tamara O'Neill 


2 









10 


4 


Elodie Montivero 


1 




2 




16 


4 


Mary Ann Nigro 







4 




18 


4 


Melissa Taylor 


1 









7 


2 


Alison Gianotto 







1 







1 


Janice Cavuto 







1 




10 


1 


Jennifer LaBelle 


















Christina Papadatos 


















Ann Trento 


















Tracey Pena 


















Tammy Serafini 












2 





GOALIE STATISTICS 




GA 




SV 




SHTS 


01 Tammy Serafini 




15 




96 




144 


00 Diana Luts 




23 




93 




133 




'jfik'-t 




*«. 




100 





H 



ow much a difference can 
one player make? When that 
player is Noelle Meeke, the 
answer is plenty. A 28-year-old 
sophomore from Northern 
Ireland, Meeke led the wom- 
en's soccer team to a six game 
improvement over last season. 
Just the second player in school 
history to be named an Ail- 
American, Meeke broke just 
about every school record 
imaginable this season. The first 
Kean women's soccer player 
to be named NJAC Player of 
the Year, Meeke had 31 goals, 



11 assists, 73 points and eight 
game-winning goals. 

Joining Meeke in leading 
Kean to an 11-6-1 record was 
senior captain Cavuto and jun- 
ior Lacey Thiery who were 
both second team All-NJAC 
and All-College Soccer Asso- 
ciation of New Jersey selec- 
tions. Thiery was second on the 
team in scoring with eight goals 
and 11 assists for 27 points. Fa- 
nelli ended her career with the 
same grit and determination 
she started with four years ago. 



101 



NAME 


GOAL 


ASSISTS 


SHOTS 


PTS 


Jason Smith 


9 




6 




60 


24 


Petter Villegas 


8 




7 




86 


23 


Jose Castillo 


7 




3 




29 


17 


Stephen Roberto 


6 




1 




23 


13 


George Mousis 


4 




3 




34 


11 


Colomb Thomas 


4 




2 




16 


10 


John Ricciardulli 


1 




6 




16 


8 


Kevin Denver 


1 




3 




17 


5 


Ivan Munoz 


2 




1 




13 


5 


Michael DePinho 


1 




3 




7 


5 


Charles Ciolino 


2 









5 


4 


Marco Alves 







3 




8 


3 


Sebastian DePinho 


1 









11 


2 


James Kavanagh 


1 









1 


2 


Rosario lacono 







1 




5 


1 


Lawrence Linares 







1 




1 


1 


Peter Dixon 







1 




13 


1 


Scott Lee 












7 





Jermaine Keller 












4 





Brandon Silva 












15 





Pedro Pessoa 


















Justin DeReamer 












1 





P.J. Petrow 


















Paolo Clermont 


















Michael McGrath 


















GOALKEEPER STATISTICS 












NAME 




GA 


SV 


SHu 


W L 


T 


Brian Murphy 




24 


64 


9 


14 6 


1 


Michael Allen 



















Mike McGuinness 




















4\ "* * — -f 



i 



i 






t: 



1^ ' 






.1 A L; 





I he Cougars kept their post 
season streak alive at 14 as they 
captured the championship of 
the ECAC Tournament. 

The 14-6-1 squad was led by 
Keller who was an All-Confer- 
ence, All-State and All-Region 
selection. Keller, who began 
his career by winning a nation- 
al championship and ended it 
with an ECAC crown, was also 
an Adidas Regional Scholar- 
Athlete. 

Joining Keller on the All- 



Conference team is freshman 
Petter Villegas, sophomore 
Jose Castillo and junior Jason 
Smith. 

George Mousis capped his 
career in Union by being 
named the Most Valuable Play- 
er of the ECAC Tournament. 
Also ending illustrious careers 
at Kean are Stephen Roberto 
(6g, 1a), Kevin Denver (1g, 3a), 
John Ricciardulli (1g, 6a), and 
Charles Ciolino. 





ft 



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103 




104 




it 



t*BT 




m m it.it 



H 



ighlighting the fall season was 
the women's volleyball team cap- 
turing a third consecutive New Jer- 
sey Athletic Conference champi- 
onship and second consecutive 
NCAA Tournament appearance. 
Led by Zahn, Harris and Day, the 
Cougars won a school-record 35 
matches against just five defeats. 

A three-time NJAC Player of the 
Year, Zahn was named the GTE/ 
CoSIDA Academic Ail-American of 
the Year which is the highest honor 
ever attained by a Kean athlete. 



Day and Harris were both All- 
NJAC selections. Day led the con- 
ference in assists while Harris was 
among the NJAC leaders in hitting 
and kills. 

Three other seniors were major 
factors in Kean's unprecedented 
feat. Laura Bryant, Jennifer Gre- 
gory, and Ana DeAlmeida were the 
unsung heroines of the Cougars 
and just as instrumental in the 
team's accomplishments over the 
past four years. 




105 



Cheerleading 








▼TTTTTTTTTTTT 




106 



Scoreboard 



Field Hockey 




Trenton State 


L 


0-7 


Phila. Textile 


W 


1-0 


Oneonta 


W 


1-0 


Groucher 


L 


3-4 


Drew Uni. 


L 


1-3 


Rowan 


W 


1-0 


Misericordia 


L 


1-2 


William Paterson 


W 


2-1 


Montclair St. 


w 


2-1 


FDU Madison 


w 


2-0 


Rowan 


L 


0-1 


Trenton St. 


L 


1-6 


William State 


W 


2-1 


Cabrini 


W 


2-1 


Wesley 


W 


2-0 


Manhattanville 


L 


6-0 



Men's Soccer 

W. Connecticut L 

Rensslaer Polytech W 

Ohio Wesleyan L 

DePauw W 

Rutgers Newark W 

Montclair State T 

Steven's Tech W 

William Paterson W 

Rutgers Camden W 

Ithaca L 

Trenton State W 

Vasser W 

Salem W 

Ramapo L 

Richard Stockton L 

C.C.N.Y. W 

Rowan L 

King's Point W 

Jersey State W 

Ramapo (ECAC SEMIS) W 
Montclair State 

(ECAC FINAL) W 3-0 



0-1 
2-0 
1-5 
2-0 
4-2 
1-1 
2-0 
2-1 
4-0 
2-3 
1-0 
3-0 
2-1 
1-2 
1-3 
4-1 
2-3 
2-1 
8-0 
1-0 



Football 



Western Connecticut 


T 


13-13 


Lock Haven 


L 


13-21 


William Paterson 


W 


24-06 


Montclair State 


W 


06-00 


Jersey City State 


w 


14-07 


Buffalo State 


L 


07-31 


Rowan College 


L 


13-42 


Brockport 


T 


03-03 


Trenton State 


L 


10-20 



Women's 


Soccer 




Goucher 


w 


3-2 


Washington & Lee 


w 


6-1 


Salem State 


w 


8-5 


Virginia Wesleyan 


w 


4-2 


Randolph-Macon 


L 


0-3 


Ramapo 


W 


4-0 


Notre Dame College 


L 


1-3 


William Paterson 


L 


1-5 


Scranton 


W 


5-1 


Richard Stockton 


L 


0-3 


Elizabethtown 


T 


1-1 


Jersey City State 


W 


5-1 


Messiah 


W 


5-1 


Trenton 


L 


0-7 


Rowan 


W 


3-1 


Mt. St. Mary 


W 


4-1 


Montclair State 


W 


4-0 


Phila. Textile 


L 


1-2 



107 





1995-96 WRESTLING 




RECORDS 




WT 


NAME 


RECORD 


118/126 


Jason Kay 


15-10 


118 


Gerard Perez 


4-12 


126 


Tom Easterbrook 


3-2 


126 


Gary Carloni 


0-3 


134 


Jakai Braithwaite 


18-7 


142 


James Hal I ik 


13-3 


142 


Blaise Rohan 


3-2 


150 


Joe Ribitzki 


2-8 


150 


Charles Carty 


2-7 


150/158 


Adam Cirlincione 


0-17 


158 


Terrence Sartor 


0-4 


158 


Tom Hansen 


3-5 


167 


Jarred Gagliardi 


0-15 


167 


Ray Hocker 


2-6 


167 


Aaron Davis 


0-5 


177 


Kirk Frazier 


0-2 


177 


Ben Bivins 


1 6-2% 


177 


Phil Eliya 


3-7 


190 


T.J. Sakas 


8-7 


Hwt 


Tom Borgia 


3-4 


Hwt 


Tim Karcich 


10-14 


Hwt 


John Clark, Jr. 


0-2 


Hwt 


Mike DiSanto 


0-1 


*Captured championship at 


King's Tour 


nament 






%Captured championship at Hunter Tour 


nament 










m 






108 




WRESTLING 



I n a tumultuous season for the wrestling 
team, Jakai Braithwaite and James Hallik 

stood above the rest. Braithwaite finished the 
year with an 18-7 record, was runner-up at 
Mets and earned a berth in the national tour- 
nament at 134-pounds. The 142-pound Hal- 
lik went 13-3, won Mets and also earned a 



spot in nationals although he could not com- 
pete. Other strong showings include 118- 
pounder Jason Kay who was 15-10 and 
placed fourth at Mets, 1 77-pounder Ben Biv- 
ins was 16-2, and heavyweight Tim Karcich 
finished sixth at Mets. T.J. Sakas was 8-7 be- 
fore an injury ended his season. An injury al- 
so cut short Ray Hocker's final campaign. 








Wks 


k JUS - 

'*■ 4T^fC| 


Hf * i 






•> 

• 1 





110 




WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



T 



alk about a New Year's present. 
Gail Gilchrest transferred to the team 
from Centenary in January and all she 
did was lead the state in scoring for the 
second consecutive year as she also 
went over the 1,000 point plateau. An 
All-Conference, ECAC and Metropoli- 
tan area selection, Gilchrest averaged 



21.6 points and 11 rebounds in 14 
games at Kean. The junior currently has 
1,111 points in three seasons at Mans- 
field, Centenary and Kean. 

Also contributing to the team were 
senior captain Kim Kenny (6.0 rpg), jun- 
ior captain Kim Singleton (9.4 ppg., 6.9 
rpg) and sophomore Meccaena Bilaal 
(13.2 ppg). 





111 




MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



w 



alter Kelly ended the prototyp- 
ical career of a Division 3 college ath- 
lete in fashion as he went over the 
1,000 point mark. The 20th player in 
school history to reach that vaunted 
goal, Kelly ended with 1,032 points. 
Not only a great scorer, the second 
team All-Conference and Metropolitan 
area selection also had almost 400 re- 
bounds and over 250 assists and 100 
steals in his career. For the season, Kelly 



averaged 16.5 points and 5.2 rebounds 
per game. 

The biggest surprise for the Cougars 
was the contribution of junior Kerrin 
Lyles. After hardly seeing the floor in his 
first two seasons, Lyles finished second 
on the team averaging 14.9 points per 
game. On his heels in scoring was Tim 
Corrigan, who returned to the team af- 
ter a one year hiatus at the College of 
Charleston, as he contributed 13.9 
points and seven boards per game. 



KEAN ATHLETIC HONORS 



Field Hockey 

Patti Benyola 

All-NJAC 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

Carey Kessler 

All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

All-NJAC 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

Margo Wrigley 

All-NJAC 

NJAC Rookie of the Year 

Football 

Trenell Smith 

First Team All-NJAC 
All-ECAC 

Joe Antico 

First Team All-NJAC 

Patsy Venetucci 

First Team All-NJAC 
Team Captain 
All-ECAC 

Mike Mahady 

All-ECAC 

Anthony Robinson 

Second Team All-NJAC 

Phillip Brown 

Second Team All-NJAC 

Windale Bates 

Second Team All-NJAC 

Niketa Zeigler 

Second Team All-NJAC 

Erik Sherman 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 
Team Captain 

Robbie Thiemann 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Andrew Onder 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Mark Cummings 

Team Captain 

Men's Soccer 

Jermaine Keller 

First Team All-NJAC 

First Team College Soccer Association of New Jersey 



First Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

Mid-Atlantic Region Adidas Scholar Athlete Second 

Team 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

George Mousis 

ECAC Tournament MVP 

Petter Villegas 

First Team All-NJAC 

Second Team Col lege Soccer Association of New Jersey 

Second Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

Jose Castillo 

First Team All-Conference 

Peter Dixon 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Rosario lacono 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

John Ricciardulli 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Jason Smith 

Second Team All-Conference 

Women's Soccer 

Noelle Meeke 

Second Team Ail-American 

First Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

First Team College Soccer Association of New Jersey 

NJAC Co-Player of the Year 

First Team All-Conference 

Cougar Classic Offensive MVP 

Lacey Thiery 

Second Team All-Conference 

Second Team Col lege Soccer Association of New Jersey 

Janice Cavuto 

Second Team All-Conference 

Second Team College Soccer Association of New Jersey 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

Chris Fanelli 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

Volleyball 

Terri Day 

First Team All-NJAC 

NJAIAW Kean College Woman of the Year 

Monica Harris 

Second Team All-Conference 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 



Universities 
Team Captain 

Loretta Zahn 

CTE/CoSIDA Academic Ail-American of the Year 

First Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

NJAC Player of the Year 

First Team All-Conference 

AVCA National Player of the Week (October 24) 

MVP of Franklin & Marshall and Hunter Tournaments 

Led nation in kills 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

Team Captain 

MEN'S BASKETBALL 

Walter Kelly 

Second Team All-NJAC 

All-Metropolitan Basketball Writers Association 

Team Captain 

1,000th career point 

Kerrin Lyles 

Honorable Mention All-NJAC 
Team Captain 

Women's Basketball 

Gail Gilchrest 

Second Team All-NJAC 

Second Team All-ECAC 

All-Metropolitan Basketball Writers Association 

1,000th career point 



Swimming 



Nina Ricci 

Team Captain 



Wrestling 



James Ballik — 142 pounds 
Metropolitan Conference Champion 

Jakai Braithwaite — 1 34 pounds 
Metropolitan Conference Runner-up 
NCAA Tournament 

Baseball (1995 season) 
Kevin Bieber 

Team Captain (1996) 

Armond Corbo 

First Team All-NJAC 

North-South All-Star Game 

Baseball Writers Association Second Team All-State 

Chris Dunbar 

North-South All-Star game 
Team Captain (1996) 
Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Allen Lopez 

North-South All-Star game 

Baseball Writers Association Second Team All-State 



Honorable Mention All-NJAC 

Frank Malta 

NJAC Player of the Year 

Charley Lau "Art of Hitting" award 

All-ECAC 

First Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 

Baseball Writers Association All-State First Team 

North-South All-Star game 

Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and 

Universities 

MEN'S LACROSSE 

Tony Calandra 

Knickerbocker Conference Player of the Year 
First Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 
ECAC Tournament MVP 
Team Captain 

jim Davidson 

Knickerbocker Conference Coach of the Year 

R.J. DeStefano 

Second Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Bill Dransfield 

Second Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Tim Fischer 

First Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Chad Jeffrey 

Second Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Nick Medvedich 

First Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 
North-South All-Star Game 
Team Captain 

Jeff Murray 

Second Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 
Team Captain 

Mark Petrone 

First Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Brad Rumsey 

Second Team All-Knickerbocker Conference 

Softball 

Tracy Burkhart 

South Jersey Co-Player of the Year 
Second Team All-Region 

Chris Fanelli 

Second Team All-Region 

Liana LaVecchia 

First Team All-Mid-Atlantic Region 
First Team All-NJAC 
Team Captain (1996) 

Ann Marie Schwarz 

Second Team All-Region 

Karen Talarico 

Team Captain 



NAME 

Jerome Steward 
Derek Dusharm 
Michael Hanley 
Michael Pirot 
David Coe 
Chad Jeffrey 
Kurt Nordman 
JP Cawley 
Ed Delaney 
Keith Martin 
Tory Casdia 
Alan Schedlbauer 
Kenneth Bennett 
Garnette Meadows 
Benjamin lustiniano 
David Dennis 
Alexis Montanez 
Vito Venetucci 
Charles Matsutaro 
Eric Hannum 
Adam Cirlincione 
Jay Vernaleken 



Michael Gaughran 
Joe Azzarello 
Ed Delaney 




116 




A 



ate coaching change and grad- 
uation caused this to be a rebuilding 
year for the usually powerful men's la- 
crosse team. With two games remaining 
the Cougars are 2-8. 

Former player James Dunn came in 
at the last minute to rescue the program 
which lost the coach and eight starters 
from last year's ECAC Championship 
team. 

Among the bright spots have been the 
play of seniors Chad Jeffrey, Tory Cas- 
dia and Michael Pirot. The last of the 
Upsaia contingent, Gasdia and Jeffrey, 
have been their usual outstanding 
selves this season. The team's top de- 
fender, Gasdia, should be a contender 




for All-Conference honors. Jeffrey (3g, 
2a) is also battling for postseason rec- 
ognition. 

Pirot is fourth on the team with five 
goals and four assists for 14 points. 

The team has a solid foundation re- 
turning with junior Mike Hartley (6g, 
6a, 18p) along with Derek Dusharm 
and Jerome Steward. Once one of the 
better defenders on the team, Dusharm 
was moved to forward three games ago 
and has leaped into second on the team 
in scoring with 1 2 goals and four assists 
for 28 points. The best freshman in the 
conference, Steward leads the team 
with 26 goals and five assists for 57 
points. 



Lll mm * , ^^ 

L * 11/ 










WOMEN'S LACROSSE STATISTICS 






NAME 






GOALS ASST 


SHTS 


Kelly Keiber 






26 


1 




64 


Angela Randazzo 






22 


2 




47 


Stacey Montgomery 






21 


1 




48 


Tammy O'Neill 






19 


3 




53 


Rachel Jones 






5 


1 




9 


Jennifer Polak 






1 


4 




10 


Gail Cilchrest 






3 


1 




10 


Michele Swawola 






1 


1 




11 


Elodie Montivero 






1 


1 




11 


Teresa Carlino 






1 







2 


Jennifer LaBelle 






1 







6 


Charmaine Rayner 






1 







2 


Kelly Karnas 






1 







9 


Jennifer Levine 









1 







Brenda MacPherson 

















Jennifer Mack 














2 


GOALIE STATISTICS 
















GA 


SAVES 


T 


GS 


GP MIN 


Jill Van den Heuvel 


105 


80 





13 


12 


732 





*fc „ Jmq 



118 




T 



he women's lacrosse team ended 
its first season of existence with an 
amazing 9-4 record including 3-2 
against other varsity clubs. For a team 
on which only one player had ever 
picked up a stick before this season, 
there are obviously a lot of quick learn- 
ers in the group. 

From the 1 0-4 victory over Montclair 
to open the season to the season-ending 
13-9 win against Wagner, a group of 
budding superstars could be develop- 
ing in Union. 



The talented group comes from a se- 
lection of the school's best athletes from 
four different sports. Most of the team is 
made up of soccer and field hockey 
transplants while there are also basket- 
ball, swimming and tennis team mem- 
bers. 

Leading the team in scoring is Kelly 
Keiber with 26 goals and 53 points. She 
is closely followed by Angela Randazzo 
(22g, 46p), Stacey Montgomery (21 g, 
43p) and Tammy O'Neill (1 9g, 41 p). 




119 





A 



n up-and-down season for the 
softball team has turned to the positive 
once again as the Cougars hit the home 
stretch. With the NJAC playoffs and 
postseason berths on the line, Kean is 
14-12. 

Liana LaVecchia's assault on the ca- 
reer record book began a little late; 
however, the slugger has finally broken 
the ice by gaining her 1 1 2th career RBI 
which surpasses the total of 1 1 1 set by 
Tracy Burkhart from 1992-95. The sen- 
ior third baseman is still in reach of the 
doubles and batting average marks. 

Ann Marie Schwarz is having anoth- 
er solid season in left. The senior is bat- 
ting .301 with 19 RBIs and 18 runs 
scored. Also ending her career in Union 



is catcher Karen Talarico who, as one 
of the school's most involved athletes, 
has excelled on and off the field. 

Sophomore Jennifer Ciesielski and 
freshman Stephanie Zitsch are having 
career years at the plate. Ciesielski was 
batting .437 with 19 runs scored before 
being hampered by a broken finger. 
Zitsch is batting .351 with a team-high 
25 RBIs. 

The pitching is being handled by the 
potent duo of sophomore Andrea Clark 
and junior Amber Lang. Clark is 5-5 
with a 3.64 era and has thrown two 
consecutive shutouts. A Southeastern 
Louisiana transfer, Lang is 9-7 with a 
2.20 era and 65 strikeouts. 




121 




T 



he baseball team has been the sur- 
prise of the NJAC with a 20-8 record. 
The Cougars are in a battle with Rut- 
gers-Camden and Rowan for the final 
two spots in the conference playoffs. If 
Kean wins the battle, it will be the first 
time since 1989 that the Cougars will 
earn a bid to the playoffs. 

There are numerous sidebars with the 
boys of summers including the play of 
seniors Jim Vircik and Chris Dunbar. 
Vircik has a shot at the school's all-time 
batting record as he boasts a .454 av- 
erage while Dunbar (.376) is just three 
runs shy of the single-season record of 
48. Seton Hall transfer Frank Beckhorn 
has contributed a .427 average includ- 
ing nine homers and 42 RBIs. 



Senior outfielders Shawn Crockett 
and Steve Giordano have been a potent 
platoon in right field. Giordano is bat- 
ting .348 with 22 RBIs while Crockett is 
at .301 with 25 RBIs. Another powerful 
platoon is behind the plate with seniors 
Allen Lopez (.41 4) and Tom Guagliardo 
(.286). 

Senior transfer Dom Sedicinohas 
done an outstanding job at second base 
while senior captain Kevin Bieber is the 
inspirational leader of the team. 

On the mound transfer Jon Ciravolo 
has been the Cougars ace with a 4-2 
record while senior Vinny Rettino is 
having his most productive year in a 
Kean uniform with two saves and a 2.53 
era. 




Women' 



vo\leyt> aU 1 

■i ,„ .is conclus 



M .„ Dunn 



bv M»« "-— vo11e vbaU team cjawed 
The Cougars *<>»'• NJA C Cham 
..... ,h,rd consecutive 



*„h Ute«» ^bn u , 

ting bom* g"" c 



inn» 



, tteii x»' J co ™ 

Kcanbaulc die"*' 
■ off the 



point 



thel""- 11 "** ain Zahn 
sudco-capiw"^ 



sets 

g.bui 



followed **? 1S 

ihree-pcav as 



Oc.ohet M. »«>- ''-.. lv , a „,ed 

a ,w M** « vhc l0 get i. ana i ^v-Sfsi km, 



latch 



<ith a I - 
.10 and 15- 



,nd!5-10v.c 
ions 



fourth set - 

derailed b 



ior.es to mrec-r--- en on lop ° f 

>J u * fl ^lc»Ham»* h0,s 



gars as they. - 
the« momentum 



"I'm) 



the 

line judge 



- said Moms- 

rS»' hewotW ' 

The Coug 

weathennf 



He called ! 




THE UNCANNY 

""ANNY 



in a Major gam "i 
FDH Drive I p 

Spent loir | 
No kidding J 



Their late fath ■ 
trainer by inad 



enough that till 
four Meeke cb£ 

This is Bcma i 
of college dut>] 



**?3*»" 






SIX VLAR-OLD DALE Pescalore 
lives in Bemardsville NJ . and 
has a serai 

-ned 3 The> i 

•w Hems for the collection, 
ie double life of their ln&h 
rile Meeke. who specie* - 



9 t* ea ° 



\i>'-' 
is"* 1 



'tw 






J.* scon 1 * s0 \>d * e grit 
■2°*.i car eet f ,„e 3ea S \ " 






roukars enjoy 
Sable of talent 



mi MJAC honors 
second « am .., Slo pperl v B ™ 

wg L' hut 1 *"* ™ We'« 

pointing.'"" ' . , lhis year *' 

- game OP a " tatk that no one 

.... heart ba« TBro my 

.. and 1 thin* , 





Dunne 
Inexperi 



the l 

Lut 

learnu 

but shot' 



getting 

ST are mstnhng that 

^S^bo-regoaheD- 
a "VI goals 

prove on that £6 fre 

\ 6 T rrnV C ^^^ 91 

-,, heC ountinpo n8( 
v/illDei-u 

Ch^ F "SlVr ta»' 

lhen f aSlbeJOU- 

Tev «*■»■ ^ 
^higb-ven-; 

tcssJg 

Stanford, an' 

, and i r 

posito. anot 

toduct I 

team*"" 




^•"MrngH graduate 



ANGELA RANDAZZO 



fating nght wing 

Local duo makinq 
an impact at Kean 



ondN 
d tha 

Vt i 



■nates at Kean CcL^esaT,^" 
about that game ^" e 

"I sard to he vLn^* ' V ^ d 
Delsea'' I dfdn', t y ° U fr 001 

1 remembii 



"Boih A,' 

contributer 

success of t» 

Kean w, 

aeatnstiJari 

Kandazzo ha' 

Cougars »i|| 

Pionsrupgau 

I rn nervo 

Playing (S a ' 

said "Uever 

natnent l,ke u, 

k><»'H-hauo,| 

w 'rigle)' is 
about the gam, 

. P rett >' good C< 

give and e re g°mg u ' 
h.vi n „ . ff^ I'willb 



Wng , „ ,. She |ets mf 

"here she , s on the field Were 
trying to work on some give and 
Kandazzo also in.H i. game '< will b 

teammate r^mlVh d me h aTL a S' mth ^- 
helped area "a 5 to be on the fir ' 

"Its nice to have another player "X^ fi T ' 
on the team from South Jersev ' 19J? ^' $h « 
she satd -We work well £££?.■ %£>*■ ^ 

said -M ^f?"'"""' resident 'he New J erS e 
!.?•»« »" I'feelsre„Mv^ P, . ay, ^ bett " ^^forlSpo 



*. «^ 



\at v^ 0* W u vo<sl 



"eysaidag.r, threw jLh'n 11 *' ^"^ " "'"" "V. but J di, 

a <V "u^hf , afeut «£££ '" as," «/ ld »°ckey coach Renee ^ -^^ 

*iS5^ > ''^.P'Ware senous now "f k "f praise for both plavers eZ to ™ ^ £ ' 

d eC .^eO ,s their careers at Kean „k An S ela «e in as a tal'.nVoJ rk , get ™* " 

^"V T a fr «hm« 'cln^T ^bman." she said .?J,^ a], "^'^ 

.i -fco^or-- %n \""ng, have combined ta P^T". wth m ° r ^ experience She Wnglev^J" 

°>>f>- °; ea r;- k "p-.choo, D a ck^. Jl a ,°L b ^^ h ^ ""«■■ 



.6 ^<> fl 



£*?>^*b> 



124 



l> and look 
St, by m*- 



inly co«ch — 

Kean wants un 



proved 



Br mc H 



y IINION - 

me. tl» 



in rtw s\ib)i' 

Ms 



l ill field- 
baseball "» m 

E»^ c \TumCasaliriobopcsso 
Rian 's foWM*"* ■H£ e 9R errors 

i„ thuSC <" B a,m 



told 



„. .vt'thinRtO 

I pmcsbyt' 



„ with the club* 
,, runs in less 
„ surprise thai Ca 
oringtheoS-sea 




(right) "ill allium < . v ", ,„,,,, 

cm) ollhe season. ViiKV. 

high lBsteals teds «1»^ ^ 
, sol,,,..! Dnwiw 



defense 

Kean Baseball 



oiher former 



Middlesex 
Counly stars w,N *»« 

Edison's 0^ K S *««« 
iranslcrrei _ ^ k rR .,,, ml , 




inejumoi forward 
•M spins in Kean s 




hard work = more winsl 



sian 
ilfer. 



' ""ou/er, 
Hane «".o,a„ 



"" h 
Wk/, 



ea Son 

"""erf 






ft^fi-r:„- 

"UL'.lr 



This 

optimistic s H u.,j 
*ed When Jersey ( 



'as 



''"■''hi, ""-"Peo 



ed 



a/7 



'"" Ka v 






e/- a; 



'eros,. 




j""*** 
**««*» 



Kean: 
!:ed, but 
I) learn 

'ecorae a hertcr 

''- 1 n*i turned in 
? f son ' s*" 1 can 





st "' has been a slab.),; 
1 lu ' n ul uous offense 
0-4 sun seemed in sho 
eaving , hcn] nt 

; laG m - 'he Cougars maoied I 

" Is 69 '" highlighted, 

mi cllon 

ecianons going mio 
"rsi "in »aj a 
The los 



' ihc i 



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oupie 

O we needed | u,,, 

'V"ne had to s, ep up 

:rr "if 10 ihe los;, , 

eo. las, years | ead , 

1 lf ic squad reeling and 

■ew leader Kim S,n„| 

-•ader by example 

""if major. (Cm ca „ use 

skills lo see ihai she , 

'season Singleion is av 

oims. and 6 5 rebounds pe 



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ne to rescue for 
tan swim team 



• TUFAflo 



? — Jum when die Kean 
J WOfn cn i smimmmg team 
I ^ 1° sink Jenniler 
K™ 1 I 1 '" die program to 

>lree vear> alter Kunvon. al 
\ ls ^a^lec, "I* - voungest col- 
mg coach m the counuy, 
Vs nnall) have their collec- 
■' above waler 
' vennn s her alma mater 
jwig «s "o easy task 
I ** cho ° l record holder in 
Jliiodiial medley who grad- 
I * 1993 was named in- 

Just five months later 
Jig a lot ol gu-ls that | )us , 
■■was kind of weird." said 
Jws given the team after 
■ Mch ran oul It was a 

mon 
I ach Brace Schaeler left 
»ly October, abandoning 
■l !« swimmers remain- 
*gram 

'icjusi showed up. gave 
•ueces of literar.... - 



> showing 
mvon was 
sister. Re 



Whar made the team 
even more special | or p. 
Ihe fact thai her younger ,.,. 
heca a lo.year.olrJ sophomore 
scored po,„, s ,„ u,, ^^ ^ 

k' „ k P c rclav evcms lo help 
als, another school mark 

"She is an excellent backslroker ' 
-djemjjfero, her sister" •„„;'„, 
Ihe besi Kean has ever had She will 
»e going lor some records of her 
^uldn'tbe happier ,„, her or 

Rebecca a standout Softball player 
sunt' °°' ^'i be talked into 
swimmmg. not once, but twice 
Jenntler coaxed Rebecca L th e 
W lunng her early teens Z 
stroked her hack ,„,o fc waTe 

when she enrolled at Kean last yet 
Ive al„ y s llked „ .. ^ Re 
becca. but I was never as good « 
"if sister She practiced ever, 
"wrung "1 every afternoon My 
hes, sport was Softball I | , e d ,, 
«"« I *as going to play (or Kem 

swuiT ! ' S ' SlK cncoura « e<l « lo 



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125 



Women's 


Basketball 


OPPONENT 


SCORE 


W/L 


E. Connecticut (2-0) 


39-45 


L 


Richard Stockton (1-1) 


56-64 


L 


Rowan (1-0, 1-0) 


43-92 


L 


Montclair(2-2, 2-0) 


55-65 


L 


Jersey City (0-5, 0-3) 


69-30 


W 


W. Paterson (4-2, 3-1) 


64-81 


L 


Trenton (5-2, 3-2) 


52-69 


L 


Rutgers-Newark (4-4) 


82-62 


W 


NYU (7-0) 


57-79 


L 


Hunter (4-4) 


64-65 


L 


Staten Island (3-7) 


76-34 


W 


W. Connecticut (7-3) 


62-76 


L 


Ramapo (3-8) 


68-65 OT 


W 


Richard Stockton (8-4) 


86-97 20T 


L 


Jersey City (1-15) 


56-42 


W 


Rutgers-Camden (7-6) 


70-87 


L 


Rowan (14-0) 


52-85 


L 


Montclair State (11-6) 


60-70 OT 


L 


Rutgers-Camden (10-7) 


69-73 


L 


Wm. Paterson (13-7) 


50-61 


L 


Trenton State (15-5) 


53-61 


L 


Rutgers-Newark (6-16) 


94-59 


W 


Richard Stockton (14-10) 


60-72 


L 


Ramapo College (6-1 8) 


86-50 


W 



; 



WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 


Opponent 


W/L 


Scores 


W. Connecticut 


W 


15-6,15-2,15-5(3-0) 


Gettysburg Invitational 






Coucher 


W 


15-12,8-15, 15-12(2-1) 


Salisbury 


W 


15-3,15-9(2-0) 


Frostburg 


W 


1 5-5, 1 5-7 (2-0) 


Albright 


W 


15-1, 15-8(2-0) 


Carnegie-Mellon 


W 


1 5-4, 1 5-2 (2-0) 


Johns Hopkins 


W 


1 5-6, 1 5-8 (2-0) 


Seton Hall 


L 


7-15, 11-15(0-2) 


lersey City 


W 


15-4, 10-15,15-1, 15-12(3-1) 


NYU 


W 


15-5, 13-15, 12-15, 15-8, 17-15 


William Paterson 


W 


15-3,15-7,15-6(3-0) 


Elizabethtown 


W 


15-13,9-15,6-15, 15-6,21-19 


F&M Tournament 






F&M 


W 


15-9. 15-8,9-15, 15-10(3-1) 


Coucher 


W 


15-11, 15-10, 15-11 (3-0) 


Allentown 


W 


15-11, 14-16, 14-16,15-7, 15-11 


Baruch 


W 


1 5-0 (F), 1 5-2, 1 5-8 (3-0) 


Rutgers-Newark 


L 


8-15, 12-15,8-15(0-3) 


luniata Invitational 






Ohio Northern 


L 


6-15,2-15,8-15(0-3) 


RIT 


w 


15-7,9-15,15-7, 15-10(3-1) 


W. Maryland 


w 


15-6,15-5,15-9(3-0) 


F&M 


w 


15-13,15-7, 15-3(3-0) 


Montclair State 


w 


15-4, 15-4, 15-11 (3-0) 


Brcxiklyn 


w 


15-3, 15-4, 15-7(3-0) 


Hunter Invitational 






W. Connecticut 


w 


15-11, 16-14(2-0) 


Hunter 


w 


15-7, 15-5(2-0) 


Binghamton 


L 


15-11, 16-18,3-15(1-2) 


Scranton 


w 


15-13, 10-15, 15-6(2-1) 


Binghamton 


w 


5-15, 15-4, 15-6(2-1) 


Hunter 


w 


15-2, 15-5, 15-4(3-0) 


Richard Stockton 


w 


11-15, 15-9, 15-4, 15-13(3-1) 


Gallaudet Tournament 






Gallaudet 


w 


15-1,16-14, 15-13(3-0) 


Mary Washington 


w 


15-11,15-12, 15-11 (3-0) 


Washington & Lee 


w 


9-15, 15-1,15-13,15-9(3-1) 


Salisbury State 


w 


15-10, 15-5, 15-9(3-0) 


Ramapo 


w 


15-0,15-1, 13-15,15-7(3-1) 


N|AC Tournament 






Ramapo (N|AC) 


w 


15-5, 15-1, 15-8(3-0) 


Richard Stockton 


w 


15-6, 15-3,9-15,15-6(3-1) 


Rutgers-Newark 


w 


15-13, 10-15,8-15,17-15,15-10 


Rowan 


w 


15-5, 15-1, 15-7(3-0) 


Allentown 


L 


11-15,5-15,9-15(0-3) 


Gettysburg 


L 


8-15. 13-15, 15-8,6-15(1-3) 



/ 



126 











« 


Men's 


Basketball 






OPPONENT 






SCORE 




Neumann (0-1) 




79-61 


W 




W. Maryland (2-0) 




67-73 


L 




Rowan (2-0, 1-0) 




62-90 


L 




Montclair (1-3, 0-2) 




83-70 


W 




Jersey City (4-2, 2-1) 




74-70 


W 




W. Paterson (2-4, 1-3) 




67-57 


w 




Trenton (3-3, 2-3) 




71-74 


L 




Rutgers-Newark (4-3) 




65-75 


L 




Caldwell (5-3) 




61-63 OT 


L 




Delaware Valley (0-11) 




62-31 


W 




Ramapo (8-5) 




72-59 


W 




Richard Stockton (2-1) 




55-71 


L 




Jersey City (10-6) 




75-89 


L 




Rutgers-Camden (0-14) 




79-48 


W 




Rowan (14-3) 




82-113 


L 




Montclair State (8-10) 




70-80 


L 




Centenary (1 1-5) 




53-66 


L 




Rutgers-Camden (0-18) 




67-63 


W 




Wm. Paterson (9-11) 




64-73 


L 




Trenton State (10-9) 




61-75 


L 




Rutgers-Newark (1 2-8) 




72-60 


W 




Richard Stockton (20-3) 




50-59 


L 




Ramapo College (1 1-13) 




68-79 


L 


■ 


Wrestling 






King's Tournament 


4th place 






NYU 


W 


44-9 




RIT Tournament 


1 0th place 






Hunter 


W 


31-15 




Rutgers-Camden 


Cancelled 








Hunter Tournament 


4th place 








Lycoming Duals 










Mount Union 




9-43 






Manchester 




2-54 






Tri-Match at Wesleyan 




2-54 






Rodger Williams 




18-32 






Wesleyan 




19-28 






Springfield 




9-43 




Rodger Williams 




21-28 




Bridgewater 




13-37 






WPI 




25-27 






Trenton 




10-34 






Oswego 




10-46 






Cortland 




3-46 






East Stroudsburg 




12-42 






Montclair 




16-40 






Mets @ Trenton 


5th place 



















nits 



Men's 


Baseball 




OPPONENT 


SCORI 




W/L 


Palm Beach Atlantic 


11-2 




W 


Palm Beach Atlantic 


10-7 




w 


Northwood (FL) 


13-4 




w 


Findlay (OH) 


1-4 




L 


Findlay (OH) 


0-10 




L 


St. Thomas (FL) 


1-10 




L 


Marian (IN) 


13-2 




W 


Wilmington 


10-1 




W 


Wilmington 


6-2 




w 


Staten Island 


23-15 




w 


St. Joseph (ME) 


16-8 




w 


|ohn Jay 


12-5 




w 


Dominican 


9-2 




w 


Richard Stockton 


16-3 




w 


Richard Stockton 


8-0 




w 


FDU-Madison 


2-4 




L 


Rowan 


12-10 




w 


Rutgers-Camden 


10-12 




L 


W. Paterson 


4-11 




L 


W. Paterson 


11-14 




L 


Trenton State 


16-12 




W 


Rutgers-Newark 


13-2 




W 


Rutgers-Newark 


9-11 




L 


Bloomfield 


13-2 




W 


Rowan 


3-2 




W 


Ramapo 


14-12 




w 


Ramapo 


19-5 




w 


St. Thomas Aquinas 


20-8 




w 


WOMEN'S 






LACROSSE 






OPPONENT 


W/L 


SCORE 


Montclair State 


W 


8-2 




East Stroudsburg 


L 


1-21 




Wagner 


W 


9-8 




Montclair State 


W 


10-4 




Marist 


L 


9-10 




Goucher 


L 


2-21 




Cabrini 


L 


5-13 




Manhattanville 


W 


9-3 




Eastern Connecticut 


W 


9-8 SDOT 


All-Ivy J.V. Tourn. 








Manhattanville 


w 


9-3 




Manhattan 


w 


10-2 




UCONN 


w 


9-1 




Wagner 


w 


13-9 




1 









*k 



■« 



Women's 


Softball 


OPPONENT 


SCORE 


W/L 


Loras 


4-1 


W 


Nova (FL) 


11-12 


L 


Wise. River Fall 


3-5 


L 


Ithaca 


0-14 


L 


III. Benedictine 


6-2 


W 


Westminster, MO 


13-5 


W 


Simpson (IA) 


0-7 


L 


Elmhurst, III 


7-2 


W 


Ithaca 


6-5 


W 


Ithaca 


7-8 


L 


Allegheny 


6-5 


W 


Salisbury 


7-3 


W 


Georgian Court 


5-2 


w 


Georgian Court 


2-1 


w 


W. Paterson 


7-3 


w 


W. Paterson 


8-4 


w 


Montclair 


0-6 


L 


Montclair 


1-2 


L 


Rowan 


1-5 


L 


Rowan 


6-12 


L 


Muhlenberg 


4-5 


L 


Muhlenberg 


10-0 


W 


Trenton State 


0-12 


L 


Trenton State 


0-4 


L 


Richard Stockton 


10-0 


W 


Richard Stockton 


8-3 


W 





Men' 


s 






Lacrosse 




OPPONENT 




W/L 


SCORE 


Villa Julie 




L 


2-16 


FDU-Madison 




L 


7-15 


NY Maritime 




W 


12-11 


Stevens 




L 


7-10 


Southampton 




L 


0-35 


Quinnipiac 




L 


3-14 


Richard Stockton 




L 


1-16 


Montclair 




L 


9-17 


Wesley 




L 


7-28 


C.C.N.Y. 




W 


15-8 


Pace 




L 


1-26 


NY Maritime 




W 


16-1 5 OT 



127 



1995-96 SWIMMING 


( )ITONENT 




SCORE 


St. Elizabeth 


L 


51-71 


Montclair* 


L 


76-99 


New Rochelle 


W 


1 36-85 


William Paterson* 


L 


72-108 


Beaver 


L 


25-70 


Trenton* 


L 


33-169 


Manhattan vi lie 


W 


127-70 


Manhattan 


L 


48-75 


Rowan* 


L 


62-103 


Adelphi 


W 


57-31 


USMMA 


L 


98-1 1 7 


Hunter 


W 


1 1 3-89 


Queens 


L 


79-126 


NJIT 


W 


97-66 


Metropolitan 


Championships 


fourth place 



Glenn 


Hedden, Athletic Director 


Patricia Hannisch, Associate Athletic Director 


Sport 


Head Coach 


Basketball (men) 


Bruce Hamburger 


Basketball (women) 


Patricia Delehanty 


Baseball 


)im Casalino 


Field Hockey 


Renee Clarke 


Football 


Mike lezzi 


Lacrosse (men) 


James Dunne 


Lacrosse (women) 


(ill Cosse 


Soccer (men) 


Tony Ochrimenko 


Soccer (women) 


Fred Napoli 


Softball 


Renee Clarke 


Swimming 


Jennifer Runyon 


Volleyball 


Bridget White 


Wrestling 


John Lucia 



K 



FIELD HOCKEY 



essler and Benyola were the leaders of a team which broke the school record for wins in a season for the second consecutive time. Kean 
also earned just the second postseason appearance in team history advancing to the Eastern College Athletic Conference Tournament. 

Kessler became the second player in the history of the program to be named All-NJAC four consecutive seasons and the first two-time All- 
Region selection. In being named All-NJAC for the first time, Benyola topped the team and was among the conference leaders with eight assists. 

While Kessler's and Benyola's careers have ended, their probable successor's is just beginning. Margo Wrigley joined Kessler as the only 
other Kean player to be named conference Rookie of the Year. Also an All-Conference selection, Wrigley was second on the team in scoring 
with six goals and seven assists for 19 points. 

Also playingin her final season was the team's vocal leader in Leah "Quiet Thing" Bentcliff. 



SWIMMING 



T 



he swim team did it again. The Cougars topped last year's best-ever fifth place finish at Mets with a fourth place showing this season. Kean 
also surpassed last year's record medal total with 1 1 . 

Ending her career is senior Nina Ricci. Ricci tied her own school record with seven medals at Mets. The captain placed first in 30 events this 
season and second in nine others. 

Ricci's career may have ended with a bang, but Michelle Russell's also started with one. The freshman was second on the team with 1 8 firsts 
and she placed first or second in 30 of 34 events. The breastroke specialist finished a best-ever second place at Mets in the 100 breast. 

Also having outstanding years were Rebecca Runyon and Jolie Werner who combined for 36 first and second place showings. 



128 




j"ganizations 




129 



N.9.A. 




Harry Williams 

State Legislative Director 
Brad Streets 
Asst. Director 
Delia Matula 
Federal Legislative Director 
Robert Kohn 
Director 



130 



ft 



Association of Asian 

Qtudenfs 


















131 



College Center Board 





132 



it 



Biology Club 






133 




Pan African 
Qtudent Union 




134 



» 






M.C.9.U. 









135 



Kean College 
Gospel Choir 








136 



% 






Pakistani 

Cultural Club 









137 



(*/•■ •v/«K«M« 





138 



A.L.A.9 




139 



LAMBDA THETA PHI 







140 






I.9.A. 









141 




KARATE CLUB 







142 






CAMPUQ DAY CARE 

KEAN COLLET 








:•. 






143 




Jose Garcia Layout Editor 





jflHB "*r\ 




h^tf 4MMr J i 




^l 



Jean Ralph Victor Treasurer 



Muriel Celestin Editor-in-Chief 



tyeniOi>attilia 



&*H 




Sherarde Volmar Photographer 



144 





145 



, 



rt. 




'■'■^Hiiim 



mm* 













149 



Commencement 



Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-Six 
The One Hundred and Forty-First Year of the College 

PROCESSION OF THE CLASS OF 1996 
Kean College of New Jersey Concert Band 
Professor Robert Yurochko, Conducting 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

Peter Andrew Hinrichsen, Class of 1996 

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION OF PLATFORM GUESTS 
Henry J. Ross, Interim President of the College 

OPENING REMARKS 

Scott Robert Bohm, Class of 1 996 

Council for Part-Time Students 

CONFERRING OF HONORARY DEGREES 
Jacinto Marrero, Chairperson, Board of Trustees 

Maryanne Trump Barry 
Doctor of Laws 

Ben Vereen 

Doctor of Humane Letters 

ADDRESS 

Samuel Dewitt Proctor 

PRESENTATION OF PROFESSOR EMERITUS 
James R. Murphy 



150 



PRESENTATION OF FACULTY AWARDS 

Henry J. Ross, Interim President of the College 

Presidential Excellence Award for Teaching 

Presidential Excellence Award for Scholarship/Creative Works 

PRESENTATION OF THE CLASS OF 1996 

Sandra F. Mark, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Charles E. Anderson, Dean, School of Business, Government and Technology 

Ana Maria Schuhmann, Dean, School of Education 

Edward B. Weil, Dean, School of Liberal Arts 

Betty W. Barber, Dean, School of Natural Sciences, Nursing, and Mathematics 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES IN COURSE 
Henry J. Ross, Interim President of the College 

ALMA MATER 

SENIOR MOMENT 

Rhonda Lea Moseley-Holmes, Class of 1996 

Student Organization 

ALUMNI WELCOME 
Jane Bodzioch, President 
Alumni Association 

CLOSING REMARKS 

Martin David Odom, Class of 1996 

Graduate Student Council 

RECESSIONAL 



151 



COLIN POWELL 



In September, 1995, 
Colin Powell em- 
barked on a cross- 
country book tour to pro- 
mote his autobiography, 
"My American Journey." 
As he did this, he also 
promoted the notion that 
his next journey might be 
along the campaign trail, 
seeking the presidency of 
the United States in 
1996. 

Powell, 58 years old, is 
the former chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
the first African-Ameri- 
can person to hold that 
position. He rose to fame 
through his leadership in 
the Persian Gulf war. 

The views expressed 



by Powell seem to leave 
him out of either main- 
stream Republicans or 
Democrats. In his book, 
he asserts his belief in 
free enterprise and lower 
taxes, and says that he is 
put off by "patronizing 
liberals." He does, how- 
ever, support women's 
rights, gun control, and 
was alarmed by a "trou- 
bling mix of politics and 
religion" at the 1992 Re- 
publican convention. 

He sees himself as the 
"sensible center of the 
American political spec- 
trum," declaring no alle- 
giance to any political 
party. 





O.J. SIMPSON VERDICT 



rn October 3, 
1995, the long- 
running, real- 
life soap opera played its 
final episode. 

In "the trial of the cen- 
tury," O.J. Simpson was 
acquitted in the June 12, 
1 994, stabbing murder of 
his former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson, and her 
friend, Ronald Goldman. 
Americans followed 
the trial for more than a 
year, listening to testi- 
mony, digesting the evi- 
dence and speculating 
on whether the former 
football superstar and 
film actor was guilty. 

The jury reached its 
verdict in less than four 
hours deliberation, after 
listening to 133 days of 
testimony and consider- 
ing more than 800 pieces 



of evidence. 

It was a case that 
would leave Americans 
with many lasting imag- 
es: 

— A white Ford Bron- 
co leading a police 
chase; 

— Simpson trying on 
"the murder gloves" in 
court; 

— The testimony of 
prosecution witness Po- 
lice Detective Mark Fuhr- 
man, whose credibility 
was later destroyed when 
it was shown that he lied 
under oath about his use 
of racial epithets. 

In a statement made 
soon after his acquittal, 
Simpson vowed he 
would dedicate his life to 
a search for the real kill- 
ers. 



152 




MILLION MAN MARCH 



CAL 

RIPKEN'S 

STREAK 

or months, basebal 
fans were talking about 
The Streak. With each 
game he played, Baltimore 
Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, 
Jr. drew one game closer to 
breaking one of baseball's 
"unbreakable" records. 

In 1939, Yankee first base- 
man Lou Gehrig retired after 
having appeared in 2,130 
consecutive games, an ac- 
complishment that surely 
would never be equaled. 

In 1995, Ripken not only 
equaled it — he surpassed it! 

On September 6, 1995, 
Ripken took the field, as he 
had done in every Orioles 
game since May 30, 1 982, to 
play against the California 
Angels. This was consecutive 



The gathering in 
Washington, D.C. 
on October 1 6, 
1995, was tremendous. 
Hundreds of thousands of 
African-American men 
converged on the na- 
tion's capital in response 
to the call from Louis Far- 
rakhan, the Nation of Is- 
lam's leader, to rally for 
unity and brotherhood. 

It was the fourth largest 
demonstration in Wash- 
ington's history, and the 
largest predominantly Af- 
rican-American gather- 
ing. 

There were dozens of 
speakers, including civil 
rights veterans Rosa 



Parks, Dick Gregory and 
the Reverend Jesse Jack- 
son. Stevie Wonder sang, 
and Maya Angelou read a 
poem that urged the men 
to do right by themselves 
and "save your race." 

The rally's climax was 
Farrakhan's speech in 
which he led the men in 
a pledge to "never raise 
my hand with a knife or 
gun to beat, cut or shoot 
. . . any human being." 
He urged the rally to join 
organizations, gain polit- 
ical control, fight racism 
and rid their neighbor- 
hoods of crime, drugs 
and violence. 




game 2,131 — but not until 
the fifth inning, when base- 
ball games-become official. 

When the fifth inning 
came, fireworks exploded 
and cameras flashed as 10- 
foot banners bearing "2-1-3- 
1" were unfurled in the out- 
field stands of Baltimore's 
Camden Yards. 

The fans stood and 
cheered for Ripken, who 



emerged from the dugout and 
gave his jersey to his wife and 
two children. His teammates 
pushed the reluctant Ripken 
back out onto the field where 
he made a "thank you" lap 
around the ballpark, shaking 
hands with the fans. The ova- 
tion lasted 22 minutes. 

Befitting a hero, Ripken hit 
a home run in the game won 
by the Orioles 4-2. 



GRAF DEFEATS SELES AT U.S. OPEN 



MP 



t was a match between 
two players vying for the 
top position in women's 
tennis. On September 9, 
1995, Germany's Steffi Graf 
emerged as #1 as she beat 
Monica Seles in New York to 
win her fourth U.S. Open ti- 
tle. 

For Graf, it was the third 
consecutive Grand Slam title, 
coming after victories at 
Wimbledon and at the 



French Open. 

"Nothing can ever come 
close to this one. I had a lot 
of obstacles to climb over," 
said Graf, who played with a 
bone bruise on one foot. An- 
other complication was 
Graf's father who is serving 
time in a German prison on 
tax fraud charges. 

In spite of her defeat on the 
tennis court, Monica Seles 
feels like a victor of sorts. This 



loss was the first in a dozen 
matches that marked her in- 
spired return to the sport after 
a two-year absence. Seles 
had been stabbed in the back 
by a deranged fan at a match 
in Hamburg, Germany. 

"It has been very exciting 
to me playing again," Seles 
said. "As long as I keep hav- 
ing fun, that is what is going 
to matter to me the most." 



153 



HURRICANE OPAL 



On the evening of 
October 4, 1995, 
Hurricane Opal 
came ashore on Florida's 
Gulf Coast, packing sustained 
winds of 125 miles per hour. 
Before it was through, the 
storm had killed at least 20 
people in four states and 
caused at least $1 .8 billion in 
damages to insured proper- 
ties, making it the third cost- 
liest storm in U.S. history. 

Hurricane Opal swung 
east toward Florida after strik- 
ing Mexico's Yucatan Penin- 
sula. 

The storm destroyed or 
damaged thousands of 
homes and businesses along 
a 1 20-mile stretch of the Flor- 



ida Panhandle. Many of its 
residents were still recovering 
from and repairing damage 
inflicted by Hurricane Erin 
two months earlier. 

Opal caused the sea to rise 
1 5 feet and sweep away near- 
ly everything on the lower 
floors of homes and business- 
es along the edge of the Gulf 
Coast. Power outages were 
widespread, and there were 
many incidents of looting. 

Some of the hurricane's 
victims were allowed to re- 
turn home a week after flee- 
ing, even though water, elec- 
tricity and sewer services had 
not been restored. Others, 
from more severely damaged 
areas, had to wait longer. 





OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING 



n April 19, 
1 995, a car 
bomb explod- 
ed in Oklahoma City 
(OK), destroying the Al- 
fred P. Murrah Federal 
Building and killing 
scores of men, women 
and young children. 

The force of the blast 
tore off the building's fa- 
cade and sent it flying 50 
feet across the street, 
where it slammed into 
another building and 
came to rest in a parking 
lot. With the outer wall of 



the building suddenly 
gone, workers tumbled 
out of their offices and in- 
to the street where the 
blast had carved a crater 
30 feet wide. 

Shortly after the explo- 
sion, Timothy McVeigh, 
a Gulf War veteran, was 
arrested for carrying a 
concealed weapon. Two 
days later, he was recog- 
nized as one of the 
bombing suspects and 
was charged. 

McVeigh's trial is 
pending. 



AMTRAK CRASH 



The news was terrible: 
an Amtrak train de- 
railed while crossing a 
trestle in a remote desert re- 
gion of Arizona, 55 miles 
southwest of Phoenix. 

What made the news even 
worse was the suspicion of 
sabotage. 

Occurring around 1 AM on 
October 9, 1995, the derail- 
ment of Amtrak's Sunset Lim- 
ited, en route from Miami to 
Los Angeles, sent four of its 
cars into the gulch 30 feet be- 
low the trestle. One person 
was killed and more than 70 
were injured. 

The derailment was caused 
by the removal of a metal bar 
that held two sections of rail 
together. The culprit installed 
a wire, disabling a light that 



would have warned the 
train's crew about the break. 
The saboteur's apparent 
knowledge about the warn- 
ing system led to speculation 
that it might be the work of a 
railroad employee. 

Found at the scene was a 
letter that made reference to 
the federal sieges at Waco, 
Texas, and Ruby Ridge, Ida- 
ho, and also mentioned the 
FBI and the Bureau of Alco- 
hol, Tobacco and Firearms. It 
was signed "Sons of Gesta- 
po." 

The letter raised fears that 
the derailment was the work 
of anti-government terrorists 
although experts in the field 
were unfamiliar with the sig- 
nature. 




154 




PRESIDENT CLINTON 



President Bill Clin- 
ton entered the 
third year of his 
term as no president has 
done for 40 years — with 
a Republican Congress. 
As he began this new 
year, he resolved to "put 
aside partisan differenc- 
es." 

In April 1995, the Sen- 
ate passed a bill that cut 
$16 billion from various 
social programs while 
sparing other items fa- 
vored by Clinton. Al- 
though the president 
called the bill "the model 



of how we can work to- 
gether," the gap re- 
mained wide over such 
issues as tax cuts, welfare 
reform, and spending re- 
ductions. 

Although cautious in 
dealing with the new 
Congress, Clinton has 
raised his profile and tak- 
en a firm stand on issues. 
He said he would try to 



work with the Republi- 
cans on their agenda, but 
would "no doubt" veto 
some of their proposals. 
On April 14, 1995, 
Clinton filed the neces- 
sary documents with the 
Federal Election Com- 
mission and made formal 
his candidacy for re-elec- 
tion. 



BOB DOLE CAMPAIGN 



'\A 



/ 



hy do 
you 
want to 
be president?" asked the 
TV host. 

"Every country needs a 
president," replied Repub- 
lican Senator Bob Dole. 

In April 1995 the Kan- 
sas Senator became the 
sixth Republican to for- 
mally declare his candi- 
dacy for a move into the 



White House in 1996. 

This is the third presi- 
dential attempt for Dole, 
who unsuccessfully ran in 
Republican primaries in 
1980 and 1988. His inten- 
tion is to cut taxes, bal- 
ance the budget, and 
"lead America back to her 
place in the sun." 

Dole began his political 
career in 1951, serving in 
the Kansas legislature. He 




served in the House of 
Representatives from 1961' 
through 1969 and has 
been a Senator since. 

Dole's latest bid to be- 
come president does not 
have precedence on its 
side — only three times 
have sitting Senators been 
elected President. 

Age is another factor 
that may discourage vot- 
ers. If elected, Dole would 
be 73 years old upon en- 
tering office. This would 
make him the oldest new- 
ly elected president in his- 
tory. 




he Cleveland In- 
dians and the At- 
lanta Braves 
squared off in the first 
World Series in two 
years. This was, perhaps, 
the first between teams 
with politically incorrect 
nicknames. 

The hard-hitting Indi- 
ans compiled a lofty team 



WORLD SERIES 

batting average of .291 
for the season, while the 
Braves pitching staff, led 
by Greg Maddux (19-2), 
was widely acknowl- 
edged to be the game's 
best. 

It was a Series of the 
bats vs. the arms. And in 
the end, the arms were 
held aloft in triumph. 



The Braves won the Se- 
ries in six games, after 
taking a two-games-to- 
none lead in their home 
park. They won the Series 
on their return to Atlanta 
with a 1 -0 victory marked 
by David Justice's home 
run and the one-hit pitch- 
ing of Tom Glavine, who 
was named Series MVP. 



155 




MIDEAST PEACE ACCORD* 



// 



T 



he sight you 
see before 
you . . . was 
impossible, was unthinka- 
ble, just three years ago," 
Israel's Prime Minister Yit- 
zhak Rabin told those 
present at the East Room 
of the White House. 

The "sight" was the 
September 28, 1 995, sign- 
ing of an accord between 
Israel and the PLO that 
would end Israel's military 
occupation of West Bank 
cities and lay the founda- 
tion for a Palestinian state. 
President Clinton pre- 
sided over the ceremony 
which featured two hours 
of speeches and pageantry 



before an audience of dip- 
lomats, foreign ministers 
Cabinet secretaries and 
members of Congress. 

The agreement outlines 
the process for gradua 
withdrawal of Israeli 
troops and transfer of gov 
erning authority for Pales- 
tinian self-rule in 30 per- 
cent of the West Bank. It 
also allows for Palestinian 
elections and the release 
of 5,000 Palestinian pris 
oners being held by Israel. 
* Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin was assassinated by 
a Jewish extremist in Israel 
on Saturday, November 4, 
1995. 



CONFLICT IN BOSNIA 



Despite continued NA- 
TO air strikes and 
U.N. peace efforts, the 
conflict in the former Yugoslavia 
rages on, with no letup in sight. 
1995 began with a four month 
ceasefire mediated by former 
United States President Jimmy 
Carter, but the truce didn't put an 
end to the fighting. 

The former Yugoslavia has 
been the scene of a civil war 
since June 1 991 , and the fighting 
intensified in 1992 after the re- 
public of Bosnia-Herzegovina 
declared its independence. 

Bosnian Serbs, seeking inde- 
pendence from Bosnia, began 
their siege of the capital, Saraje- 



vo, as the European community 
and the United States formally 
recognized Bosnia. More than 
200,000 people have been killed 
or are missing since the fighting 
began. 

In May 1995, NATO planes 
attacked Serb ammunition de- 
pots. The Serbs responded by at- 
tacking "safe areas," killing 
many and taking hundreds of 
U.N. peacekeepers hostages. 

In June, Serbs downed a U.S. 
F-16 over northern Bosnia. The 
pilot, Air Force Captain Scott 
O'Grady, hid for six days until he 
was rescued by U.S. Marines. 

The conflict and the peace 
talks continue. 



JERRY GARCIA 



he leader of the Grateful 
Dead was gone. 
Jerry Garcia, co-foun- 
der of rock music's the Grateful 
Dead, died of a heart attack 
while in a drug rehabilitation 
center in suburban San Francis- 
co. 

The guitarist, composer and 
singer passed away on August 9, 
1995, just eight days after his 
53rd birthday. 

Deadheads, as the group's fol- 
lowers were known, quickly 
gathered to note the passing of 
their fallen leader. Crowds 
formed in public areas in San 
Francisco, Garcia's hometown, 
and in other cities to share their 



loss. A single red rose was tied to 
a tree in front of the San Francis- 
co address where the Dead be- 
gan in 1964. 

The Grateful Dead blended 
rock, bluegrass and folk flavors 
into their own sound. Although 
studio recordings by the group 
were rare — the most recent was 
released in 1989 — the Grateful 
Dead remained a very popular 
concert attraction. 

Jerry Garcia had the rare dis- 
tinction of having an ice cream 
flavor named for him — Ben & 
Jerry's "Cherry Garcia." The 
company's founders said that 
Garcia had inspired their busi- 
ness philosophy. 




POPE JOHN PAUL II VISITS UNITED STATES. 




WOMEN'S CONFERENCE IN 
CHINA 



t was Hillary Clinton's first 
visit to China, and she made 
it a memorable one. In a 
speech to the United Nations' 
Fourth World Conference on 
Women, the first lady took on 
the world. 

Her speech, delivered on Sep- 
tember 5, 1995, made a call for 
human rights and freedom of ex- 
pression, and she said that it was 
i indefensible that many women 
who registered for the confer- 
ence were denied visas or were 



unable to fully participate. 

Mrs. Clinton surprised her au- 
dience and the host nation by re- 
buking Beijing for its treatment 
of private activists who said they 
were harrassed by authorities 
during a parallel forum held in 
Huairou, China, just 30 miles 
away. 

The conference platform 
called for measures to alleviate 
women's poverty and improve 
health care, job opportunities 
and education. 



or a few days, a re- 
ligious man domi- 
nated the head- 
lines. And for a change, it 
gave Americans some- 
thing good to talk about. 

The newsmaker was 
Pope John Paul II, and the 
occasion was his visit to 
the United States in early 
October 1995. 

The 75-year-old pontiff 
began his five-day visit 
by addressing the United 
Nations General Assem- 
bly in conjunction with 
the organization's 50th 
anniversary. 

During his stay, the 
Pope celebrated outdoor 



Mass in both New York 
and New Jersey. Rainy, 
windy weather did little 
to dampen the spirits of 
the faithful who gathered 
to hear him speak, catch 
a glimpse of him, or even 
touch him as he swept 
past. 

In Baltimore (MD), he 
addressed an audience at 
the baseball stadium and 
lunched at a soup kitchen 
before flying back to 
Rome. 

Throughout his visit, 
the Pope called for great- 
er attention to the needs 
of the less fortunate. 




157 



IGNITE 



This Final Editor's note is very special to me because of my affiliatin with the 
graduating class. I know like my classmates, I will not forget my years (4) at 
this institution. I will also not forget those who shared my goals. So as my 
final act as Editor-in-Chief I say to the Class of 1996. "Congratulations and may your 
degree be the spark that "IGNITES" your future. 1 ' Thank you to my Family — Mom- 
my, Daddy, Lynn and Ruth (The Celestins), Tiger, Memorabilia Staff, Student Org. 
(Dave Brown, Regina Troutman, Stephanie Faser), Yearbook Advisor (Bruce O. 
Mclntyre), P.A.S.U. (Stanley Neron), my influential professors and former classmates, 
for being my support during my short stay. Special thanks to my God who makes all 
things possible. 




STAY POSITIVE AND 
TRUE TO YOURSELF 

Muriel E. Celestin 

Kean College of New Jersey 



158 



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